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Ensure that personnel who interact with the body (health care or mortuary staff, or the burial team) apply standard precautions, 2,3 including hand hygiene before and after interaction with the body, and the environment; and use appropriate PPE according to the level of interaction with the body, including a gown and gloves. If there is a risk of splashes from the body fluids or secretions, personnel should use facial protection, including the use of face shield or goggles and medical mask; Prepare the body for transfer including removal of all lines, catheters and other tubes; Ensure that any body fluids leaking from orifices are contained; Keep both the movement and handling of the body to a minimum; Wrap body in cloth and transfer it as soon as possible to the mortuary area; – There is no need to disinfect the body before transfer to the mortuary area;...
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3. World Health Organization. (2020). Infection prevention and control during health care when COVID-19 is suspected: interim guidance, 25 January 2020. https://www.who.int/publications-detail/infectionprevention-and-control-during-health-care-whennovel-coronavirus-(ncov)-infection-is-suspected- 20200125. (accessed March 22, 2020).
Safety procedures for deceased persons infected with COVID-19 should be consistent with those used for any autopsies of people who have died from an acute respiratory illness. If a person died during the infectious period of COVID-19, the lungs and other organs may still contain live virus, and additional respiratory protection is needed during aerosol-generating procedures (e.g. procedures that generate small-particle aerosols, such as the use of power saws or washing of intestines); If a body with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 is selected for autopsy, health care facilities must ensure that safety measures are in place to protect those performing the autopsy; 4 Perform autopsies in an adequately ventilated room, i.e. at least natural ventilation with at least 160L/s/patient air flow or negative pressure rooms with at least 12 air changes per hour (ACH) and controlled direction of air flow when using mechanical ventilation; 5 Only a minimum number of staff should be involved in the autopsy; Appropriate PPE must be available, including a scrub suit, long sleeved fluid-resistant gown, gloves (either two pairs or one pair autopsy gloves), and face shield (preferably) or goggles, and boots. A particulate respirator (N95 mask or FFP2 or FFP3 or its equivalent) should be used in the case of aerosol-generating procedures. 6...
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5. World Health Organization. (2009).Natural ventilation for infection control in health care settings. World Health Organization. https://apps.who.int/iris/handle/10665/44167 (accessed March 22, 2020).
Safety procedures for deceased persons infected with COVID-19 should be consistent with those used for any autopsies of people who have died from an acute respiratory illness. If a person died during the infectious period of COVID-19, the lungs and other organs may still contain live virus, and additional respiratory protection is needed during aerosol-generating procedures (e.g. procedures that generate small-particle aerosols, such as the use of power saws or washing of intestines); If a body with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 is selected for autopsy, health care facilities must ensure that safety measures are in place to protect those performing the autopsy; 4 Perform autopsies in an adequately ventilated room, i.e. at least natural ventilation with at least 160L/s/patient air flow or negative pressure rooms with at least 12 air changes per hour (ACH) and controlled direction of air flow when using mechanical ventilation; 5 Only a minimum number of staff should be involved in the autopsy; Appropriate PPE must be available, including a scrub suit, long sleeved fluid-resistant gown, gloves (either two pairs or one pair autopsy gloves), and face shield (preferably) or goggles, and boots. A particulate respirator (N95 mask or FFP2 or FFP3 or its equivalent) should be used in the case of aerosol-generating procedures. 6...
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6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2020). Interim guidance for collection and submission of post-mortem specimens from deceased persons under investigation (PUI) for COVID-19, February 2020. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/guidance-postmortem-specimens.html (accessed March 22, 2020).
Human coronaviruses can remain infectious on surfaces for up to 9 days. 7 COVID-19 virus has been detected after up to 72 hours in experimental conditions. 8 Therefore, cleaning the environment is paramount....
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7. Kampf G, Todt D, Pfaender S, Steinmann E. Persistence of coronaviruses on inanimate surfaces and their inactivation with biocidal agents. Journal of Hospital Infection. 2020;104(3):246-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.022(accessedMarch22,2020).
Human coronaviruses can remain infectious on surfaces for up to 9 days. 7 COVID-19 virus has been detected after up to 72 hours in experimental conditions. 8 Therefore, cleaning the environment is paramount....
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8. Aerosol and Surface Stability of SARS-CoV-2 as Compared with SARS-CoV-1 https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc200 4973
placed on a surface for at least 1 minute. 9 Hospital-grade disinfectants may also be used as long as they have a label claim against emerging viruses and they remain on the surface according to manufacturer’s recommendations; Personnel should use appropriate PPE, including respiratory and eye protection, when preparing and using the disinfecting solutions; and Items classified as clinical waste must be handled and disposed of properly according to legal requirements....
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9. Kampf G, Todt D, Pfaender S, Steinmann E. Persistence of coronaviruses on inanimate surfaces and their inactivation with biocidal agents. Journal of Hospital Infection. 2020;104(3):246-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhin.2020.01.022(accessedMarch22,2020).
10. World Health Organization. (2020). Water, sanitation, hygiene, and waste management for the COVID-19 virus. Interim guidance: 19 March 2020. https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/33 1499/WHO-2019-nCoV-IPC_WASH-2020.2- eng.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y (Accessed March 22, 2020).