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For further details please refer to WHO's Safe management of wastes from health-care activities (1999) at: http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/medicalwaste/wastemanag/en/
For further information about preparing bleach solutions for disinfection purposes in resource-poor areas, please view the WHO and CDC combined document "Infection Control for Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers in the African Health Care Setting." (1998) http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/spb/mnpages/vhfmanual.htm
For more information see "Infection Control for Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers in the African Health Care Setting" 19 (http://www.
On page 56
19 World Health Organization and Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. Infection Control for Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers in the African Health Care Setting. Atlanta, Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, 1998: 1-198.
For more information see "Infection Control for Viral Haemorrhagic Fevers in the African Health Care Setting" 19 (http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/spb/mnpages/vhfmanual.htm).
Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology (JSTOR)
Julia S. Garner et al. 1996
5. Garner, J, and Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee. Guideline for Isolation Precautions in Hospitals. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. 1996. 17:53- 80
American Journal of Infection Control (Elsevier BV)
William A. Rutala 1996
9 Rutala, W.A. APIC Guideline for selection and use of disinfectants. American Journal of Infection Control 1996: 24(4):313-342
Annals of Internal Medicine (American College of Physicians)
Richard P. Wenzel et al. 2003
The organism responsible for the disease is a novel coronavirus – SARS CoV. 12
On page 44
The novel coronavirus has been found in sputum, tears, blood, urine and faeces. 12
On page 44
The organism can be shed in the faeces for 30 days and has been shown to survive on hard surfaces for more than 24 hours. 12
On page 44
12 Wenzel, R.P. and Edmond, M.B. Listening to SARS: Lessons for infection control. Annals of Internal Medicine. 2003. 139 (7): 592
The American Journal of Forensic Medicine and Pathology (Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health))
Susan M. Claydon et al. 1993
14 Claydon, S.M. The high risk autopsy. Recognition and protection. American Journal of Forensic Medical Pathology. 1993. 14: 253-256
Journal of Clinical Pathology (BMJ)
S W Newsom et al. 1983
A post mortem examination of someone who had or probably had SARS is classified as a very high-risk procedure. 15 Therefore a post mortem should be avoided if at all possible.
On page 51
15 Newsom S.W.B., Rowlands, C. Matthews, J., et al. Aerosols in the mortuary. Journal of Clinical Pathology. 1983. 36: 127-132.
7. World Health Organization, South East Asia Regional Office. Guidelines on Prevention and Control of Hospital Associated Infections. SEA-HLM-343. New Delhi, WHO, January 2002.
11. Prüss, A. and Townsend, W.K. Teacher's guide: management of wastes from health-care activities . WHO, Geneva, 1998 (available at http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/medicalwaste/en/ )